The Signal: News & Notes from the Pharos Team


New Research Shows Formaldehyde No Longer Used in Residential Fiberglass Insulation

Jim Vallette - November 18, 2015

The BlueGreen Alliance Foundation and Healthy Building Network made the following announcement coincident with today's opening of the Greenbuild Conference and Expo in Washington DC.  Both organizations have booths in the Expo hall (BGAF is located at Booth #t3766 and HBN is at Booth #2622). FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Eric Steen, erics [at] bluegreenalliance.org Jim Vallette, jim [at] healthybuilding.net New Research Shows Formaldehyde No Longer Used in Residential Fiberglass Insulation Well-Informed Public, Green Building Advocates Led Push for Manufacturers to Phase Out Toxic Chemical WASHINGTON, D.C. (Nov. 18, 2015) – New research shows the light density residential fiberglass insulation industry in the U.S. and Canada has finally eliminated the use of formaldehyde-based binders in its manufacturing. Formaldehyde is a human toxicant with a long history of use in residential insulation, but it—like 62,000 other ch...

Rapid change sweeps flooring industry

Jim Vallette - November 13, 2015

Resilient floors and carpets made today are quite different than those made just a few years ago.  On Monday morning, I will join flooring experts from manufacturing firms, architecture and design firms, and hospitals, to discuss these changes at the Healthcare Design Conference in Washington, D.C. (1) From recycled content to plasticizers to coatings, transformation is the norm in resilient floors and carpets.  Here’s a synopsis of the movement underfoot: Recycled Content.   The big trend here is the move to restrict the use of post-consumer polyvinyl chloride (PVC) in flooring, due to supply chain concerns.  Our April 2015 report, supported by testing by the Ecology Center, found that old PVC sheathing from wire and cable scrap, has made its way into floors, and with it, a lot of toxic heavy metals like lead.(2) Tarkett, Interface, Mohawk, and Armstrong are among the industry leaders that have restricted post-consumer scrap.  Home improvement...

Not LEEDership: Supply Chain Optimization Guidance Neutralized Under Chemical Industry Pressure

Tom Lent - November 12, 2015

When is a Supply Chain Optimization credit, not a Supply Chain Optimization credit? Apparently when the American Chemistry Council (ACC) has a hand in writing the rules. The USGBC announced yesterday the results of its sprawling 11 month Supply Chain Optimization Working Group’s efforts to provide guidance for LEED v4’s Building product disclosure and optimization credit Option 3. In it one can clearly see the markings of a bitterly divided group. The outcome, however, is a clear win for the ACC, at least in the short term.  Put simply, this "supply chain optimization" option doesn’t require a manufacturer to report on the health and safety of their supply chain nor to demonstrate that they have done anything meaningful to improve it. It only requires a plan that promises a little bit better in the future and no accountability on that promise.   The intent of the LEED credit is to encourage selection of products whose composition is inventoried ...

Kaiser says no to antimicrobial surfaces in its facilities

Tom Lent - November 11, 2015

  In an October 13 memo, the healthcare giant Kasier Permanente prohibited its design teams from specifying fabric, furniture or finishes with any chemicals from a list of 13 antimicrobials that HBN researchers found are commonly used in building products. Kaiser cited research from the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) that concludes that there is no evidence that antimicrobials prevent disease. In a recent Health Facilities Management interview John Kouletsis, vice president for facilities planning and design at Kaiser Permanente, indicated that the CDC view is shared by the infection prevention community in Kaiser: “They said with a pretty loud voice that these additional chemicals do not provide the layer of protection that they claim, but proper terminal cleaning is the most effective means.” This builds on Kaiser’s long history of aligning its purchasing and building policies to avoid hazardous antimicrobials, flame retardants, and many o...

More Impending Changes in the Insulation Market

Rebecca Stamm - November 6, 2015

Recently in Healthy Building News, Jim Vallette described positive changes in the composition of residential fiberglass insulation where formaldehyde has been completely phased out in the US and Canada.(1) We have also learned, in the course of research for the BlueGreen Alliance Foundation, that significant material changes are imminent in polystyrene insulation as well, where commonly used blowing agents and hazardous flame retardants are slated for phase out in the coming years. Rigid polystyrene foam insulation – often referred to by Dow’s trade name for its polystyrene product, Styrofoam™ – comes in two forms, expanded and extruded polystyrene (EPS and XPS). These products primarily differ in their manufacturing process and blowing agents, leading to differing performance and cost. Both can be used in a variety of insulation applications including under slab, foundation wall, and exterior wall sheathing, and both currently include substances of...

Kaiser says no to antimicrobial surfaces in its facilities

Tom Lent - November 4, 2015

  In an October 13 memo, the healthcare giant Kasier Permanente prohibited its design teams from specifying fabric, furniture or finishes with antimicrobials drawing its banned list from a 2014 HBN study of antimicrobials commonly used in building products. Kaiser cited research from the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) that concludes that there is no evidence that antimicrobials prevent disease. In a recent Health Facilities Management interview John Kouletsis, vice president for facilities planning and design at Kaiser Permanente, indicated that the CDC view is shared by the infection prevention community in Kaiser: “They said with a pretty loud voice that these additional chemicals do not provide the layer of protection that they claim, but proper terminal cleaning is the most effective means.” This builds on Kaiser’s long history of aligning its purchasing and building policies to avoid hazardous antimicrobials, flame retardants,...

Consumer Reports warns parents: phthalates migrate from PVC floors

Jim Vallette - July 9, 2015

Parents should wash their toddlers’ hands, and regularly mop vinyl floors, especially if children crawl on the floors, warns the Consumers Union in the August 2015 issue of Consumer Reports. (1)   The Consumers Union is the advocacy arm of the venerable Consumers Reports magazine. It has “long raised concerns about phthalates,” the article notes. Over twenty percent of the composition of some vinyl sheet flooring is phthalate plasticizer. Public health authorities have determined that many phthalates are detrimental to developmental health. Some phthalates are carcinogens.   In response to these concerns, the world’s largest flooring companies – Mohawk and Tarkett – along with leading retailers Home Depot, Lowe’s, and Menards, this year have announced that they are phasing-out the intentional use of phthalate plasticizers in vinyl flooring by the end of this year. (2)   The Consumers Union tested 17 vinyl floors...

New health concerns about common additives to carpet fibers

Jim Vallette - July 8, 2015

Public health experts are sounding new alarms about two types of chemicals that are applied to carpet fibers: perchlorate anti-static treatments and perfluorochemical stain repellents. Perchlorate anti-static treatments Carpet manufacturers often add anti-static (antistat) treatments to carpet fibers, in order to prevent the buildup of electrical charges. Carpet manufacturers have not typically disclosed the presence of these fiber additives, but sometimes clarity can be found upstream, from chemical manufacturers such as BASF.  The world’s largest chemical company sells a line of antistats called Irgastat P. BASF’s product brochure recommends using Irgastat P on polypropylene carpet fiber. (1) A BASF material safety data sheet for Irgastat P22 states that this treatment contains sodium perchlorate (CAS no. 7601-89-0) (2) The US EPA has identified sodium perchlorate as an “emerging contaminant,” due to its growing presence in drinking water an...

Fly ash in concrete causing flooring installation failures

Jim Vallette - June 15, 2015

Floor Trends magazine last week uploaded an enlightening video interview with consultant Lew Migliore (LGM & Associates). Migliore raised an issue that is just coming to light in the flooring industry: increasing proportions of fly ash in concrete underlayment are causing flooring installation failures. “The fly ash issue has just escalated,” Migliore said. “Just recently, the American fly ash association and the concrete industry have come to some agreement where more can go into the concrete, which was a celebrated event for them. When you get up to about forty percent fly ash content, it starts to create issues of flooring materials not sticking to the surface of the concrete. Now, increasing that to upwards of 60%, the likelihood of you sticking anything to that floor becomes very remote. “Who knows as a flooring contractor how much fly ash is in the concrete?” he asked. “No one thinks to ask that. When there’s a failure...

Of Phthalates and Fraud: A Twitter mini-series

Jim Vallette - June 9, 2015

Intro. #FollowTheMoney: Sixteen tweets on phthalates and fraud:inside @ExxonMobil’s efforts to save its poison plasticizers.— Jim Vallette (@HBNJim) June 2, 2015 Pt1 #FollowTheMoney 1998: American Council on Science and Health (@ASCHorg) hires Dr. Gilbert Ross, fresh out of prison, as Medical Director— Jim Vallette (@HBNJim) June 2, 2015 Pt2 #FollowTheMoney 1995-7: Dr. Ross loses license, spends 22mo in jail for #Medicaid #fraud. http://t.co/VIbyfaKBVG pic.twitter.com/ZswjLbRCql— Jim Vallette (@HBNJim) June 2, 2015 Pt3 #FollowTheMoney 1998: Exxon expands its #phthalate plasticizer plant in Baton Rouge, La., largest in the #USA. pic.twitter.com/OMGKbgkG1b— Jim Vallette (@HBNJim) June 2, 2015 Pt4 #FollowTheMoney 1999: Europe bans some phthalates in toys “to protect babies who are now in their first years.” http://t.co/1eZsb1u3IP— Jim Vallette (@HBNJim) June 2, 2015 Pt5 #FollowTheMoney 1999 ACSH report led by ex-Surgeon General C.E. Koop...